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Open Source Developers Are Rock Stars
"Rock stars get where they are in the music world by being great musicians; open source rock stars get where they are by writing

When I was a kid, all I wanted to be was a rock star. I wanted to play guitar, get up on stage, and have everyone scream while I cranked out some hard rockin' tune. I wanted to see lighters held up in the crowd as I finished my last set - dripping with sweat, completely tired, and no energy left. Leave it all on the stage - that's what I wanted. My friends all felt the same - we talked about it all the time.

Well, that never happened. Instead I went to college and spent more time in the computer center than I did at parties. The only thing I cranked out was code. Later, I got a job writing software and I've been working with computers ever since.

While I still listen to a lot of music and have Gigs of tunes on my iPod, my dreams of being a rock star have faded. I still think about them once in a while, but more than that, I now think about open source. So do a bunch of my friends - we talk about it all the time.

I met a guy at the Softpro computer book store off Route 128 in Burlington, MA, a while ago. (I hang out there now instead of the record shop.) He writes financial applications for a mutual fund company in Boston. All he wanted to talk about was JBoss. He'd spent some time working on the JMS implementation but had gotten too busy to continue. He wanted to get back involved as soon as he could. All those people who were building the latest JBoss - he wanted to be one of them.

In his eyes I saw the same stars I used to have. I used to think that way about Robert Plant and Jimmy Page. I wanted to be one of them. When I was younger, I ran out to buy the latest Led Zeppelin album - now I run out to get the latest build of Gentoo or Hula.

Open source developers are the rock stars of the software world. The parallels actually go pretty far. You can say they don't get the money and fame, but I think you're wrong. The average open source developer probably makes more at his or her job than most local musicians make. I've met open source developers who have founded software companies and are doing pretty well financially. As far as fame goes, they may not do quite as well as real rock stars but some do pretty well; Linus Torvalds is fairly famous, but I guess not like Kurt Cobain.

They're also usually the most talented developers. Rock stars get where they are in the music world by being great musicians; open source rock stars get where they are by writing great code.

Naming their projects is a lot like naming their bands. When you hear people talking about Subversion, Ethereal, or Excalibur (all open source projects), it's hard to tell if they mean software projects or rock bands.

A good friend of mine called me once and went on for 30 minutes about how he was submitting a patch to the Jakarta Struts project (a JSP framework from the Apache Software Foundation). His patch would allow you to define validations for one input field based on the value of some other field (e.g., if you fill in a last name, make sure you fill out a first name...). He was totally excited about it and went into all the details of how he built it.

After he was done telling me about it, he was almost out of breath. I reached in my pocket, pulled out a lighter, and stood there holding it lit in the air.

Leave it all on the stage.

About Kevin Bedell
Kevin Bedell, one of the founding editors of Linux.SYS-CON.com, writes and speaks frequently on Linux and open source. He is the director of consulting and training for Black Duck Software.

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Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

In a way, I agree with Art Cancro - those who stand out in the public are not necessarily be, and the fact that it is often not the case, those who are the major contributor (not to count the magnitude of "negative" deveopments brought about by them, as it'll just make the story too long to comprehend.

Yet if we step down and look at our society at its present form - we have much similarities from a wide variety of areas. Homosepians aren't that imaginative after all, don't you think?

By the way, there are actually some good points about this kind of "system"; it is that people that live by the simple mind frame of seeking (erm...) fame will try their best to perform as designed by those "high up" - so they can truly serve their "masters" with all their hearts and all their souls.

And by keeping the "success rate" low but finite, you can attract loads of morals to serve your purpose of altering (applying to both good and bad sense, if there have been such distinctions the behaviour of our society.

That's how I preceive of our society and especially the open source community so far.

Totally wrong. The "rock star" mentality creates a popularity contest -- the people who achieve that kind of image are the people who make the most noise, NOT NECESSARILY THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE THE MOST VIABLE PROJECTS. It's a bad thing, and it's left some really good hackers unnoticed.

'I have spread my dreams under your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.'

Says it all.

At least we developers can still have some dreams, even as we grow older

OOPS, i meant to say u could be a wonderful coder and
a rock star.

if u would only get the latest version of Mandriva u could
be a wonderful *and* a rock star.

;0

Dude, you so totally rock -- can I be you when I grow up? Yup, that's exactly how I think about the highly visible core lead developers (frontmen, mouthpieces) of successful free software projects... We, you're adoring fans, wanna live in the limelight too, want to be in your presence, hoping that in some way your success will rub off on us, and our little pet projects will make it out of the garage and onto the world stage. We all wanna change the world. How can we not idolize those like us who have, and still are?

[...Plus! Unlike rockstars, GNU geeks almost never die on hotel bathroom floors in pools of their own vomit, thousands of miles from home. But then on the other hand we do run the risk of selling out "Hello, Bill? You want to buy my program? No way! Hell N---... *HOW* much? Well, of *course* I own the rights, how fast can I sign them over?]




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