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Teaching Kids Programming: Even Younger Kids Can Learn Java
One day my son Dave (10) showed up in my office with my rated 'R' Java tutorial in his hands

My solution to the problem? I've written my own e-book on it: Java Programming for Kids, Parents and Grandparents. Dave became my first kid student and this has helped me a lot to understand the mentality of the little people.

This is what I've learned while working on this project:

  • Most of the programming tasks require minimal knowledge of arithmetic and algebra skills. To start programming, a kid needs to understand what x = y+2 means. Another important concept to understand is an if statement.

     

  • Kids develop the abstract reasoning abilities by the fourth-fifth grade, and they also easily perform such tasks as browsing the Web, downloading and installing software. Dave have learned how to type, compile and run Java programs in Eclipse IDE in no time.

     

  • Kids learn much faster than adults, but they do not have "previous programming experience", which may actually be a good thing, because they do not have to switch from a procedural to object-oriented way of thinking. After learning about inheritance, Dave called my wife a superclass.

     

  • Adults are responsible creatures, and they can keep doing boring operations much longer that kids. Programming lessons with kids have to be short. One or two 45-minute lessons per week is enough. High school kids should be able to study more, but I do not have such experience yet.

     

  • Some people suggest using Logo as a first programming language for kids, mainly because it has a tool that lets you program with pre-drawn shapes like dogs and turtles. There is an opinion that REALbasic is also good for young programmers. Yes, this language has such concepts as objects, inheritance, casting and overloading, but who uses this language in the real world? Some recommend using Python. The syntax of these languages is not that much easier than Java. There are also plenty of people who write nostalgically about their first Atari computer...

     

  • Illustrations help. In my book I've included lots of color cartoon-like characters that are like a Java-fabric softener .

     

  • Kids like to see immediate results and enjoy playing with shorter programs, for example a class Fish has a method dive(int howDeep). Let me try to call this method several times with different arguments...

     

  • Graphical programming is the most fun, and even a fairly large program like Calculator, Tic-Tac-Toe or Ping Pong can be explained to children.

     

  • There is a middle school in Berkley, CA where six graders start learning Java. This school is equipped with Sun Server and multiple workstations. There is a long waiting list of kids that want to get accepted into this school.

Now I'd like to offer you a fragment from my e-book Java Programming for Kids, Parents and Grandparents. I hope you'll agree with me that even younger kids can learn Java.

Java programs consist of classes that represent objects from the real world. Even though people may have different preferences as to how to write programs, most of them agree that it's better to do it in a so-called object-oriented style. This means that good programmers start with deciding which objects have to be included in the program and which Java classes will represent them. Only after this part is done, they start writing Java code.

Classes and Objects

 

Classes in Java may have methods and attributes.

Methods define actions that a class can perform.

Attributes describe the class.

Let's create and discuss a class named VideoGame. This class may have several methods, which can tell what objects of this class can do: start the game, stop it, save the score, and so on. This class also may have some attributes or properties: price, screen color, number of remote controls and others.

In Java language this class may look like this:

 

class VideoGame {
String color;
int price;

void start () {
}
void stop () {
}
void saveScore(String playerName, int score) {
}
}

Our class VideoGame should be similar to other classes that represent video games - all of them have screens of different size and color, all of them perform similar actions, and all of them cost money.

We can be more specific and create another Java class called GameBoyAdvance. It also belongs to the family of video games, but has some properties that are specific to the model GameBoy Advance, for example a cartridge type.

 

class GameBoyAdvance {
String cartridgeType;
int screenWidth;

void startGame() {
}
void stopGame() {
}
}

In this example the class GameBoyAdvance defines two attributes - cartridgeType and screenWidth and two methods - startGame() and stopGame(). But these methods can't perform any actions just yet, because they have no Java code between the curly braces.

 

In addition to the word class, you'll have to get used to the new meaning of the word object.

The phrase "to create an instance of an object" means to create a copy of this object in the computer's memory according to the definition of its class.

A factory description of the GameBoy Advance relates to an actual game the same way as a Java class relates to its instance in memory. The process of building actual games based on this description in the game factory is similar to the process of creating instances of GameBoy objects in Java.

In many cases, a program can use a Java class only after its instance has been created. Vendors also create thousands of game copies based on the same description. Even though these copies represent the same class, they may have different values in their attributes - some of them are blue, while others are silver, and so on. In other words, a program may create multiple instances of the GameBoyAdvance objects.

Creation of a Pet
Let's design and create a class Pet. First we need to decide what actions our pet will be able to do. How about eat, sleep, and say? We'll program these actions in the methods of the class Pet. We'll also give our pet the following attributes: age, height, weight, and color.

Start with creating a new Java class called Pet in My First Project. Now we are ready to declare attributes and methods in the class Pet. Java classes and methods enclose their bodies in curly braces. Every open curly brace must have a matching closing brace:

 

class Pet{
}

To declare variables for class attributes we should pick data types for them. I suggest an int type for the age, float for weight and height, and String for a pet's color.

 

class Pet{
int age;
float weight;
float height;
String color;
}

The next step is to add some methods to this class. Before declaring a method you should decide if it should take any arguments and return a value:

 

  • The method sleep() will just print a message Good night, see you tomorrow - it does not need any arguments and will not return any value.
  • The same is true for the method eat().It will print the message I'm so hungry…let me have a snack, like nachos!.
  • The method say() will also print a message, but the pet will "say" the word or a phrase that we give to it. We'll pass this word to the method say() as a method argument. The method will build a phrase using this argument and will return it back to the calling program.

The new version of the class Pet will look like this:

 

public class Pet {
int age;
float weight;
float height;
String color;

public void sleep(){
System.out.println("Good night, see you tomorrow");
}

public void eat(){
System.out.println(
"I'm so hungry…let me have a snack, like nachos!");
}

public String say(String aWord){
String petResponse = "OK!! OK!! " +aWord;
return petResponse;
}
}

This class represents a friendly creature from the real world:

Let's talk now about the signature of the method sleep():

public void sleep()

It tells us that this method can be called from any other Java class (public), it does not return any data (void). The empty parentheses mean that this method does not have any arguments, because it does not need any data from the outside world - it always prints the same text.

The signature of the method say() looks like this:

public String say(String aWord)

This method can also be called from any other Java class, but has to return some text, and this is the meaning of the keyword String in front of the method name. Besides, it expects some text data from outside, hence the argument String aWord.

How do you decide if a method should or should not return a value? If a method performs some data manipulations and has to give the result of these manipulations back to a calling class, it has to return a value. You may say, that the class Pet does not have any calling class! That's correct, so let's create one called PetMaster. This class will have a method main()containing the code to communicate with the class Pet. Just create yet another class PetMaster, and this time select the option in Eclipse that creates the method main(). Remember, without this method you can not run this class as a program. Modify the code generated by Eclipse to look like this:

 

public class PetMaster {

public static void main(String[] args) {

String petReaction;

Pet myPet = new Pet();

myPet.eat();
petReaction = myPet.say("Tweet!! Tweet!!");
System.out.println(petReaction);

myPet.sleep();

}
}

Do not forget to press Ctrl-S to save and compile this class! To run the class PetMaster click on the Eclipse menus Run, Run..., New and type the name of the main class: PetMaster. Push the button Run and the program will print the following text:

 

I'm so hungry…let me have a snack like nachos!
OK!! OK!! Tweet!! Tweet!!
Good night, see you tomorrow

The PetMaster is the calling class, and it starts with creating an instance of the object Pet. It declares a variable myPet and uses the Java operator new:

Pet myPet = new Pet();

This line declares a variable of the type Pet (that's right, you can treat any classes created by you as new Java data types). Now the variable myPet knows where the Pet instance was created in the computer's memory, and you can use this variable to call any methods from the class Pet, for example:

myPet.eat();

If a method returns a value, you should call this method in a different way. Declare a variable that has the same type as the return value of the method, and assign it to this variable. Now you can call this method:

String petReaction;

petReaction = myPet.say("Tweet!! Tweet!!");

At this point the returned value is stored in the variable petReaction and if you want to see what's in there, be my guest:

System.out.println(petReaction);

Inheritance - a Fish is Also a Pet
Our class Pet will help us learn yet another important feature of Java called inheritance. In the real life, every person inherits some features from his or her parents. Similarly, in the Java world you can also create a new class, based on the existing one.

The class Pet has behavior and attributes that are shared by many pets - they eat, sleep, some of them make sounds, their skins have different colors, and so on. On the other hand, pets are different - dogs bark, fish swim and do not make sounds, parakeets talk better than dogs. But all of them eat, sleep, have weight and height. That's why it's easier to create a class Fish that will inherit some common behaviors and attributes from the class Pet, rather than creating the classes Dog, Parrot or Fish from scratch every time.

A special keyword extends that will do the trick:

 

class Fish extends Pet{
}

You can say that our Fish is a subclass of the class Pet, and the class Pet is a superclass of the class Fish. In other words, you use the class Pet as a template for creating a class Fish.

Even if you will leave the class Fish as it is now, you can still use every method and attribute inherited from the class Pet. Take a look:

Fish myLittleFish = new Fish();
myLittleFish.sleep();

Even though we have not declared any methods in the class Fish yet, we are allowed to call the method sleep() from its superclass!

Not all pets can dive, but fish certainly can. Let's add a new method dive() to the class Fish now.

public class Fish extends Pet {

int currentDepth=0;

public int dive(int howDeep){
currentDepth=currentDepth + howDeep;
System.out.println("Diving for " + howDeep +" feet");

System.out.println("I'm at " + currentDepth +
" feet below sea level");
return currentDepth;
}
}

The method dive() has an argument howDeep that tells the fish how deep it should go. We've also declared a class variable currentDepth that will store and update the current depth every time you call the method dive(). This method returns the current value of the variable currenDepth to the calling class.

Please create another class FishMaster that will look like this:

 

public class FishMaster {

public static void main(String[] args) {

Fish myFish = new Fish();

myFish.dive(2);
myFish.dive(3);

myFish.sleep();
}
}

The method main() instantiates the object Fish and calls its method dive() twice with different arguments. After that, it calls the method sleep(). When you run the program FishMaster, it will print the following messages:

Diving for 2 feet
I'm at 2 feet below sea level
Diving for 3 feet
I'm at 5 feet below sea level
Good night, see you tomorrow

Have you noticed that beside methods defined in the class Fish, the FishMaster also calls methods from its superclass Pet? That's the whole point of inheritance - you do not have to copy and paste code from the class Pet - just use the word extends, and the class Fish can use Pet's methods!

One more thing, even though the method dive() returns the value of currentDepth, our FishMaster does not use it. That's fine, our FishMaster does not need this value, but there may be some other classes that will also use Fish, and they may find it useful. For example, think of a class FishTrafficDispatcher that has to know positions of other fish under the sea before allowing diving to avoid traffic accidents :)

About Yakov Fain
Yakov Fain is a Java Champion and a co-founder of the IT consultancy Farata Systems and the product company SuranceBay. He wrote a thousand blogs (http://yakovfain.com) and several books about software development. Yakov authored and co-authored such books as "Angular 2 Development with TypeScript", "Java 24-Hour Trainer", and "Enterprise Web Development". His Twitter tag is @yfain

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Reader Feedback: Page 3 of 3

Actually, your wife is more of an interface, since Java doesn''t support multiple inheritance. Basic Kid functionality (play, eat, sleep) would be provided by Aspects. ;-)

So good, it is a way to show that Java is not only a powerful language, it is a useful tool to every level people, and could be used for new generations starting for our kids.

Pedro Rozo
Sun Certified Web Component Developer for J2EE
Vancouver/Canada

"After learning about inheritance, Dave called my wife a superclass."
Assuming have already taught your son that he should not treat woman as objects, I would imfer that your wife, or any woman, could only be an abstract class. Hmmm...I''ll leave that one alone!

Excellent article.

Maybe I''m younger than I thought! I have a whole slue of Java books, that I just can''t ''get.'' Having cut my teeth in VB, Java is a totally different animal, or so it seemed. I read the article, and actually got it. There is a light at the end of the tunnel!

Excellent article...

Sorry about that... the posting filter chopped my message. The rest goes...

...simplifies things like Blue (http://www.bluej.org/). When you use BlueJ, you can get right into the main ideas of object orientation without having to deal with the emparrassment of having to explain things like ''public static void main (String[] args)'' and other administrivia. Teaching core concepts first is very important and BlueJ makes that easy... and yes, it''s free too.

Sure and IDE can help, but most are ridulously over complicated. For something like this, you should consider an environement that actually simplifies things like BlueJ. When you use BlueJ, you can get right into the main ideas of object orientation without having to deal with the emparrassment of having to explain things like ''public static void main (String[] args)'' and other administrivia. Teaching core concepts first is very important and BlueJ makes that easy... and yes, it''s free too.

Thank you, Andrew. The only way to keep the interest of a kid is to use very simple examples and show them how they can quickly get results. You should also use game-like approach - all kids like to play games.

Using an IDE is a must, and Eclipse is the best FREE professional IDE available.

Speaking of publishing this book in paper... This book must be printed in color, which is really expensive. I''ll be happy to do this if some publisher will take care of the bill...

Looks great! I too searched for such books and found nothing that would keep the interest of a teenager.

I''m glad you decided to use an IDE. Some other books just use the Java SDK command-line approach. Nostalgic, but hardly likely to impress a generation brought up on WYSIWYG GUIs and video games. I started teaching my son using BlueJ (www.bluej.org) - a simple but good teaching IDE - but found it hard to sustain interest without examples he could relate to.

Hope you can get this published in paper form as well as e-book.

Interresting. Unfortunately, this kind of tutorials is very cultural oriented. It is hard to adapt it to cross-culture

Great work

eXCELLENT AND iNTERSTING


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