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Microsoft Wins Stay of Court Order Forcing Java into Windows
Microsoft Wins Stay of Court Order Forcing Java into Windows

(February 7, 2003) - Microsoft won an important round this week, when the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay on a court order requiring Microsoft to include Sun's Java software in Windows operating systems within 120 days. Microsoft had planned to comply with the first step of the injunction, which was to ship a version this month of Windows XP Service Pack 1 that doesn't include Microsoft's Java Virtual Machine.

"We're pleased the Fourth Circuit has stayed the order order and will hear our appeal on an expedited basis."" said Microsoft spokesman Jim Desler. "We believed all along it was appropriate that this matter be decided by the circuit court before we move forward with implementing the injunction." Desler continued, "We'll still have to decide whether we'll go ahead with SP1. How this impacts our plans, it's too early to tell."

"We regret the Fourth Circuit's decision," commented Lee Patch, Sun VP for legal affairs. "We will work actively to ensure that the earliest possible date is set for the appellate hearing."

No date has been set yet for the appeals court to review the case.

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Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

I may be mistaken in my understanding of what you have written but it does seem that you have misunderstood the nature of the court case. It us Sun that has taken Microsoft to court and it is Sun that is hoping to get Java distributed with the various versions of Microsoft Windows, which doesn't seem to support the notion that Java is in some way replacing windows or that Java will become the only choice for IT application development.

Microsoft is without doubt close to a monopoly on the intel platform, and there are not many serious competitors against the intel platform - Unix is chiefly for servers, Macs have a tiny perceptage of the desktop market and Linux is so much like Unix that it is also chiefly employed for servers (or by enthusiasts as a desktop using KDE or GNOME with X-window).

I like Java but I will admit that development in J2EE is not as effeicient as development in the .NET framework - of course J2EE is cross platform and nicely scalable while .NET is not cross platform and may have some scalability issues.

My hope is that both Java and .NET survive and prosper and that a rich variety of development platforms continue to be available for IT professionals.

Isn't it starting to make sense?

Most of my developer friends feel incredibly excited when they hear how the new ColdFusion MX runs on top of J2EE platform.. with more reliabillity and scalability than ever before.

Isn't it?

Really I dont think MS has anything to compete with java except maybe the court case they stick to so much. To me its obvious that the NET platform was designed with the primary goal to support the court case agains Sun and Java. The real question is why is MS so badly against Java and the answer is because in couple years Java will became the only alternative whatever you intend to do in IT. This is a war between the old windows platform whether you patch it with NET or not, and a new Java platform designed to proove itself with its real world usability not only in the court room like the NET.

Lets shake things up a bit... force MS to stop using their own JVM and leave it up to them to include Java in their OS or not. No Java? No applets. IE as a browser would really start to suck. Mozilla and Opera start looking better.

Java doesn't need MS's help. But MS needs Java's. Maybe I'm a dreamer, but I'd like to see Windows and IE and Office and all the other MS spew be replaced by Linux, Mozilla, and KOffice. Let's cripple the beast rather than ride on its back. The future is open, people; we're still in the infancy of the computing age.

Or is it really too late? Is there no turning back? Will my children's children have to see the word "Microsoft" whenever they use a computer? What if all cars today were Fords? (shudder)

Yes, it's been very frustrating to have been in this industry for so long and to have watched unstoppable erosion of our technological choices, options and opportunities. The industry has been sucked into a slow death spiral towards one monolythic set of technologies of dubious technical merit. Consider for a moment just what limited choices of platform and tools a developer has these days compared to what could be. Developers are the front-line victims in the battle over choices here. I don't think the user's realize what they are losing.

Microsoft has been found to be a monopolist but with their 850 lawyers, they have managed to thwart any real penality. Worst of all, the behavior has not changed and the entire industry continues to be damaged. This 'stay' of something that is obvious to anyone in the industry shows that our justice system has become unjust by Federal judges pandering to large legal teams and forgetting the real reason they are there. To keep the bullies from taking over!!!




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