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New Survey Shows Java Use Increasing - But .NET Still a Threat
New Survey Shows Java Use Increasing - But .NET Still a Threat

(October 15, 2002) - More than 600 developers polled in a new survey were virtually split on development plans for Java architecture, and Microsoft's .NET. According to interviews in the latest installment of Evans Data Corporation's North American Developer Survey series, 40 percent of developers are developing apps for Microsoft .NET now but 63 percent will target .NET a year from now. Yet while 51 percent are developing for the Java architecture today, 61 percent expect to write for Java next year.

The recent survey found the number of applications incorporating Web services is expected to grow significantly in the coming year. Web services adoption, now standing at 57 percent of developers polled, is expected to jump to 87 percent next year.

A little less than half of the developers polled, 43 percent, are either currently deploying or expect to deploy a Web services application in the next six months. The initial development is weighted more heavily towards internal Web services applications, indicating that the first wave of deployed Web services will be business process oriented.

The most significant obstacles to Web services implementation, according to the survey, are end-to-end security (cited by 24 percent of responses), ambiguity in Web services standards (21 percent), and the technical issue of how to architect and integrate services-oriented application architectures (16 percent).

The survey also asked developers about emerging security standards used with Web services and found the three main emerging security standards are XML encryption at 46 percent of cases, security aspects of SOAP (42 percent), and XML digital signatures at slightly less than 42 percent of cases.

"Web services appears to be graduating from buzzword to business solution," said Esther Schindler, Evans Data analyst. "Six months ago, most of the Web services development was happening in departments within a company. Now, we see the experimentation period is coming to an end, and Web services is being adopted by whole enterprises. With the number of developers saying that their applications will be deployed soon, we may begin to see Web services take off in earnest."

Other notable findings from the biannual survey series' most recent volume:

  • Wireless development is expected to increase in spite of the recent slump in the telecom sector. Almost half of the respondents polled, 48 percent, indicated that they would be developing wireless applications in the next year.

  • Linux development continues to grow with 8 percent using Linux as their primary OS and 15 percent as their secondary development OS. These numbers are expected to continue to increase next year.

  • The number of Visual Basic developers is fundamentally stable but there is a marked migration from Visual Basic 6.0 and earlier to Visual Basic.Net.

    For the full report, see www.evansdata.com.

    About Java News Desk
    JDJ News Desk monitors the world of Java to present IT professionals with updates on technology advances, business trends, new products and standards in the Java and i-technology space.

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    Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

    As an experienced Java developer and former C++ one I do can compare object oriented languages. Just a couple weeks ago I've studied C# and have written simpliest examples. As a result I have found that C# is better than Java. Why?
    1) It's cleaner
    2) It's faster - well probably it's only my personal impression
    3) It has features oriented to more professional more educated programmers, than usual ones.
    I think last point is more crucial. During last years all we've heard announces like: Java for kindergarden,
    youngest Java developer in the World and so on. In fact that means Java was just occupied with illiterate yuppies who could write "Hello World!" (frequently using only wizards) and who didn't know difference between passing parameters by value and by reference, who doesn't know what are the pointers and why we need signed/unsigned ints... All these "programmers" killed Java... It's true that C# is more complicated language than Java, but I do believe that future is for C#.

    Paul

    As both a Java & .NET developer/mentor I'd prefer if both parties stopped beating on each other and found some mid-point that can be agreed upon (web services interoperability and associated standards). This constant bickering between both camps is an embarassment to our industry and your development communities. You both (SUN/MS) have enough good, bad AND ugly to spend the rest of your chest-beating childhoods fighting over (J2EE & .NET). Development has been a part of my life for 26 years now and I can't see myself doing anything else.

    So please (Bill-Scott), don't say anything unless it's going to be a positive move for the industry as a whole or for your respective product(s).

    As a Java programmer, I find Sun's continued involvement stifling. The JCP is an embarrassment to an otherwise open community. Sun recently laid off 4000 employees (on top of another 4000 not that long ago). Sun needs to take the final step and layoff Java. Everyone, except Sun, seems to be making money on Java.

    Sun's paranoid victory over Microsoft on Java stands in sharp contrast to Microsoft's confidence in releasing SOAP and CLR. Microsoft couldn't care less if Iona or any other vendor implements the entire SOAP standard or not. Let's not even mention Sun's feeble SOAP API attempt. Apache's Axis and The Mind Electric's GLUE are excellent implementations. Once again, Microsoft has nothing to fear.

    Long ago, Microsoft figured out the developer comes first, everthing else can be bought or copied. If a company develops a way to make SOAP services easier to use, I guarantee it will wind up in Visual Studio.NET.

    Sun, on the other hand, is still searching for object and language purity. Development tools can come later - usually in the form of state fair prize winning memory hogs. Instead of chasing Microsoft Office out of its campus desktops, it should be looking to get Java to talk to Office.

    If Java's survival depends on Sun, then it is doomed and we should all switch to .NET. Fortunately, I think Java has enough developer and vendor support to survive on its own and we should focus on our customers' needs: rich nimble clients, seemless integration with their favorite applications (Microsoft Office, Adobe's PDF, etc), and easy to maintain. Who makes the plumbing or who invented it (James Gosling or Don Box) is not important to me.

    If you have programmed in both Java and C#, it's hard to want to continue in Java, except for the fact it's not going away soon. Sun has a lot of catching up to do with Microsoft, and it doesn't look good. I loved Java, but .Net is a cleaner and more productive environment, and it isn't even close.




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