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Will Sun's Web Services Play Save It from .NET?
Will Sun's Web Services Play Save It from .NET?

(March 25, 2002) - There are various different ways to test the extent to which Sun Microsystems and the world of Java faces a life-or-death challenge from Microsoft Corporation and the world of .NET, but none is perhaps as effective--or as simple--as surfing over to Monster.com and searching among the 800,000 US job postings there...by technology.

Search under "J2EE" and Monster.com returns 781 jobs. Search under ".NET" and the number is only 309. For those who want to earn their living from developing software, the message is clear, J2EE still offers you the greatest scope for (well) paid employment!

After Sun's monster JavaOne conference this week it will be interesting to repeat the Monster.com search and do some comparative analysis, because if all goes well the world will see and hear and read more about Java in the next 5 days than it has heard in the previous 5 years. In other words, Sun is pushing every button it can, and forging ahead on every front, to keep its lead in enterprise computing as we enter the new age of distributed computing heralded by the fast-maturing Web services paradigm.

Critics who say that Sun is way behind in the Web services race will be able to see from the sheer breadth and wealth and energy of the assembled Java vendors that this is a far from true statement. Admittedly, the Sun-inspired Liberty Alliance initiative hasn't yet cracked the Single Sign-On nut and thus lags far behind MS Passport, and admittedly IBM stole a march in getting major companies aligned behind the Web Services Interoperablity Consortium (WS-I) without Sun's participation, but speaker after speaker this week will be standing up and contributing to the counter-argument. Java, they will be saying, is as much an active part of Web services as XML itself.

There are challenges ahead, of course. The most major one is the completion of J2EE 1.4, which it was revealed last week has slipped from the second half of 2002 to the first quarter of 2003.

Here we see the disruptive role played by Web services, because the W3C has been making changes to SOAP, the key protocols underpinning Web services, and Sun found that it couldn't incorporate those changes into the J2EE 1.4 specification soon enough to launch 1.4 at JavaOne, which would otherwise have been ideal since the emphasis this year is so much on Web services.

Nonetheless, what will developers find at JavaOne? They will find a beta release of Sun's Web Services Developer Pack, which containings XML APIs to build Web services. And they will find that Sun's chief technology evangelist, Simon Phipps, is on hand to say that Web services are very much part of the warp and woof of the Sun tapestry...and that Java developers will in 2002/3 be producing a huge worldwide surge of innovative energy that will change the entire history of software development.

Just look at the world of wireless, Phipps will be able to say, where Sun's Java technology now enables no fewer than 17 million cellphones in Japan alone, with 100 million more due to ship during 2002. (Phipps is a member of the Intenational Advisory Board of SYS-CON's Wireless Business & Technology www.wbt2.com.) No one, he will say, should underestimate the speed with which Java can and will pervade. Just as J2ME is racing ahead in the wireless space, he will say when he participates in the JavaOne keynote panel on Thursday, so J2EE will be an integral part of the Web services revolution.

There are an astonishing 67 technical sessions and 47 BOF events in the Web services track at JavaOne this year, making it by far the largest track--even bigger this year than it was in 2001, and bigger even that the J2EE track which has 53 technical sessions and 40 BOFs. The crux of Sun's argument is that Java will always be the preferred choice (over .NET) as the basis for Web services in corporations since J2EE is a tried and true enterprise-level technology, which the cluster of new technologies under the .NET umbrella is not. Corporations won't be rushing to run applications if it means relying on Windows XP, this argument runs, and sure enough according to a recent survey by the Giga, 75% of the businesses it surveyed were looking not to .NET software and services to provide the foundations for their Web services plans, but to J2EE or Java application server vendors such as IBM, BEA Systems, Sun, and Oracle.

Even without J2EE 1.4, then, JavaOne will be an exceptionally busy one for Java developers. The Java tools vendors and the 1.3 J2EE-compliant systems integrators are out in force, and Sun will be announcing tools for developing mobile apps with the release of version 4.0 of Forte for Java, which is a mobile edition that offers a set of Java APIs targeted at. PDAs and mobile phones.

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Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

You guys, .net is not a proven technology. It does not matter if it has only been 5 days. MS had a chance to use Java 5 years ago; but, they were greedy and wanted to steal Java. Now they have to reinvent the wheel; and, force all the developers to kneel down to them just because they are the king.

Why another language? Why reinvent languange after language? Because MS wants to lock you into using Windows.

I don't mind using Windows. I like using Windows. But other people might not be running Windows. I want to be able to create an application and make money on it. I want it to be adaptable and run anywhere. What happens if MS changes Windows radically? What happens if my Windows98 program does not run under XP? Java does not care about this. My program will still run.

What MS should do is get some common sense. They already have money; but, money does not guarantee common sense. They should acknowldge Java and integrated and make it better. If .Net looses, what will happen to MS?

Think about it before you start criticizing java...

Looking at the way that vendors are getting their system Java enabled and that .NET is trying so hard to swim against this current. It wouldn't be hard to imagine the world spilt into two in the near future..

1) Enterprise that buys interoperatible and open standard based application built on Java technology

2) Enterprise that self developer their application using .NET while fearfully checks the Internet for news from Microsoft about where they want to go, which technology they want to kill and replace and how much more they want to charge..

do not want to do 11/12th
so send me about it.
miss reema pathak

... of platform.

.Net == deploy ONLY where Microsoft WANTS you to deploy

It is unthinkable that a developer would, in this day and age limit themselves to Microsoft client machines. Even more shocking is that Microsoft seems to belive they can effectively shut the door on open source/Linux servers, Unix servers from Sun, IBM & HP, midrange systems, mainframes.

This is the kind of arrogance that nearly destroyed IBM in the PS/2 era. Being a "leader" does NOT give one the right to ignore the rest of the market. Everyday more and more non-Microsoft devices are being used to serve info onto the internet, and an ever wider range of non-Microsoft devices are connecting people to this information.

There may always be some jobs that allow one to turn their backs on a broad range of technologies, but the struggle between .Net & J2EE is about more than jobs.

The fact that Monster.com returns 309 for .NET as opposed to 781 for Java said much about .NET. If a new platform (.NET) could generate nearly half of Java in a short period of time, should give Sun a jitter.

Anyway, why should we all use the same development platform? What about hardware then? Should we dump everything else and start using Unix or IBM S/390? or Windows or Linux alone? Of course not. This is the beauty of a free enterprise. May the best man (or woman, if you will) win!

Whether you like it or not, .NET is here to say, and the "Redmond King" (HYH King Bill Gate) is pouring whatever it takes to make a success of the platform.

As for me, I am aligning with .NET; but if Java leads all the way, any C# programmer can switch to Java and vise-versa. Both languages are quite easy anyway, it is the architecture and implementation that really matters. It seems like programming languages are begining to look alike these days. .NET borrows a lot from Delphi, Java, C, and C++. As a Delphite, it is a no brainer to read and understand C#. I tried Java a couple of years ago, and no surprises, but quite impressed by shear number of pre-built classes that can be instantiated to do so many things. Thus, a programmer does not have to reinvent the wheels, they are already available. One can extends those classes however.

Therefore, choose your camp. The whole world cannot just be a Java programmer...And by the way, if all you knew is Java and have not been exposed to any other programming languages, I won't hire you.

My Opinion.

Gbenga Abimbola "The Alchemist"

It is not fair to use the job search from monster to predict the future of J2EE and .Net. As everybody knows, the J2EE has already being there for a couple of years, the .Net is just being released. What's important is not 5 days later, it's 1 year or 2 years later, who will laugh at last! And most of the companies post jobs on Monster is in the Microsoft alliance. And there will never be a technology that could be applied anywhere,anytime, and is always appropriate, except you ask the God create one for you.




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