Digital Edition

SYS-CON.TV
The Future of Cloud Hosting By @AtlanticNet | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]
The cloud ultimately represents not closure, but change

Five Trends That Will Shape the Future of Cloud Hosting

With $13 billion expected to be spent by American businesses alone in 2014, the cloud should no longer be considered an alternative IT model. The demand for hardware to run traditional infrastructures is in a nosedive. IBM is spending $1 billion this year, matching the amount it spent in 2013, on "workforce rebalancing" (the company's lingo for widespread layoffs). Cisco is experiencing a similarly negative impact, with a 4% decline in revenue for its equipment expected this year.

Despite those pieces of bad news for major technology brands, the cloud ultimately represents not closure, but change. It's been a gradual transition from the established to the innovative, in large part due to concerns over security. Cloud security experts scored a major victory in 2011 when Gen. Keith Alexander announced that the Pentagon would be deploying the new technological approach.

With more businesses sold on the cloud, development is accelerating, and the landscape is rapidly evolving. The following are five major trends that will change the shape of the cloud moving forward.

  1. Real-Time Per-Second Billing: One of the most compelling features of the cloud is that you pay for resources "on-demand." However, demand has typically been defined by the maximum use per billing segment (such as each hour). However, we don't pay for electric usage for an hour when we switch off the light, and we shouldn't have to do that with the cloud either. Billing based on moment-by-moment use will cut costs drastically for large server deployments. My company has seen a significant adoption of per-second billing by other cloud hosting providers after we introduced the model (coupled with real-time usage reporting to ensure predictability) to the market.
  2. Plan Standardization: On-demand billing of the cloud is enabled, in part, by the cloud's extraordinary elasticity. Despite the adaptive potential of the cloud to meet specific circumstances, users want pricing, sizes, and plans that fall within simple parameters. Just like when buying a sandwich, when we seek cloud services, we want menu items we have the option to adjust, not just a bunch of ingredients. To streamline the buying process, cloud packages will move away from à la carte pricing to bundle pricing - with all resources included, and with peak and off-peak consumption taken into account.
  3. From Hard to Solid: Those who have recently explored the cloud market may have noticed the rise of the "SSD cloud." Currently limited to early adopters, the transition from the hard disk drive (HDD) to the solid state drive (SSD) is gaining traction. The SSD is considered more advanced technology because it contains no moving parts and consistently offers better performance than an HDD. Although these drives have been extant for many years, their price has (happily) plummeted, with a drop of approximately 70% between 2009 and 2012. Their total cost of ownership (TCO) has decreased as well: a broadly inclusive 2013 energy-efficiency analysis revealed 5.4 times greater power-efficiency, on average.
  4. Cloud, Localized: As mentioned above, IBM's hardware business is being downsized. However, the company is shifting its focus into virtual machines distributed across the globe, with plans for 15 new SoftLayer datacenters underway. Other cloud providers are adding locations in markets around the world as well. Latency is reduced automatically with this strategy: cloud management platforms choose the available machine that's closest to the user. Other hosting companies, including Atlantic.Net, are rapidly deploying nodes in diverse geographic markets as well.
  5. Leapfrogging: Research published by Pew Research this year shows that many developing countries have exhibited what's called leapfrogging with phones, jumping over landline use and straight into the cell phone era. The same process is being repeated with Web infrastructure: businesses in emerging markets are skipping dedicated servers and moving straight into cloud environments.

Beyond those five general trends, the applications of cloud hosting are expanding as well. Indiana University computer scientist Geoffrey C. Fox, PhD, has noted the vast implications for biomedical research, stating that a cloud server can perform many operations faster than a supercomputer. Cloud hosting providers are attempting to match the pace of the cloud as they adjust to user expectations and competition in this rapidly changing industry.

About Marty Puranik
Marty Puranik is founder, president and CEO of Atlantic.Net, a profitable and growing Hosting Solutions Provider in Orlando. In 1994 Marty and a classmate founded Atlantic.Net from their dorm rooms at the University of Florida. Operating under the name ICC Computers, they quickly developed a reputation for quality and service and in 1995 launched one of the first commercial Internet services in North Florida. In 1996, ICC ceased retail operations to focus solely on Internet connectivity. Under Marty’s leadership Atlantic.Net became one of Florida’s largest privately-owned ISPs, providing Internet access in cities and small towns throughout Florida and the southeastern United States. Marty’s strengths as a leader and visionary have helped him lead a successful business for 17 years.

In order to post a comment you need to be registered and logged in.

Register | Sign-in

Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1



ADS BY GOOGLE
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters

ADS BY GOOGLE

The explosion of new web/cloud/IoT-based applications and the data they generate are transforming ou...
CI/CD is conceptually straightforward, yet often technically intricate to implement since it require...
Containers and Kubernetes allow for code portability across on-premise VMs, bare metal, or multiple ...
Enterprises are striving to become digital businesses for differentiated innovation and customer-cen...
Digital Transformation: Preparing Cloud & IoT Security for the Age of Artificial Intelligence. As au...
DevOps is often described as a combination of technology and culture. Without both, DevOps isn't com...
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that All in Mobile, a mobile app development company from Poland, wi...
The now mainstream platform changes stemming from the first Internet boom brought many changes but d...
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Ed Featherston has been named the "Tech Chair" of "FinTechEXPO ...
Chris Matthieu is the President & CEO of Computes, inc. He brings 30 years of experience in developm...
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: D...
Andi Mann, Chief Technology Advocate at Splunk, is an accomplished digital business executive with e...
In this presentation, you will learn first hand what works and what doesn't while architecting and d...
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids...
To Really Work for Enterprises, MultiCloud Adoption Requires Far Better and Inclusive Cloud Monitori...
We are seeing a major migration of enterprises applications to the cloud. As cloud and business use ...
If your cloud deployment is on AWS with predictable workloads, Reserved Instances (RIs) can provide ...
Disruption, Innovation, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Leadership and Management hear...
We build IoT infrastructure products - when you have to integrate different devices, different syste...
Consumer-driven contracts are an essential part of a mature microservice testing portfolio enabling ...